The Chinese Economy According to a Language Expert

English to Chinese translation services

“WASHINGTON – China’s economy is likely to surpass the United States in less than two decades while Asia will overtake North America and Europe combined in global power by 2030, a U.S. intelligence report said on Monday.”
(NBCNEWS)

“The reality is that China is unlikely to witness those astronomical growth rates, at least for some time. We may never see them again.”
(Time Business)

The above shows two conflicting forecasts of the future of the Chinese economy. Some economists suggest that the only way the Chinese market will continue to grow is by limiting foreign investment and shifting the Chinese economy from a producer to a more balanced producer/consumer model. Other economists suggest that the Chinese economy will continue to grow owed to increasing technological activity.
Of course, there are always opposing views when it comes to emerging economies. Everyone likes a good debate.

Admittedly, I’m not an economist. I’m not really going to throw my hat into the ring as to which paradigm is the correct one. I do, however, follow trending in the language industry and if these trends are in any way indicative of the way the Chinese economy is going to swing, my bet is on growth.

According to Global by Design, traditional Chinese breaks the top ten for both the most popular language category as well as the fastest growing. This is both for English to Chinese translation services as well as Chinese to other languages. Additionally, according to Google trends, English to Chinese translation variants are both “breakout” and “rising” search terms. Now, this data isn’t definitive but it still points to current growth in China’s economy (at least for now).

I can say that in my experience, I’ve seen a major leap forward in the English to Chinese translation services market. Businesses are partnering, employing, and manufacturing multilingually and owing to the continuous growth (whether short-term or long-term) of the Chinese economy, China is seeing a lot of this action.

For those that are doing business in China, it is absolutely imperative that you partner with a english to chinese translation services company that has experience in the Chinese market.

Some documents you will need to seek out an English to Chinese translation services company are:

• Internal documents
• Technical manuals
• Contracts (this is very important)
• Proprietary software
• Marketing collateral
• Websites
• Emails

Before doing business in China, gather information from us on English to Chinese translation services.

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Translation Rates – What You Need to Know

ROI Translation Rates

Crank Your ROI to the Max.

I get asked a lot of questions but the question I answer most often is “what are general translation rates?” or “how much does a translation cost?” My answer is always “Well, it depends…”

Translation Rates Depend on…

What does it depend on, you ask? First it depends on what you mean by “cost”. Do you mean the price? I’m sure most people do. What I push people to understand is that the “cost” of purchasing translation services is far below the “cost” of not doing it or purchasing inferior quality work. I want translation services purchasers to think of translation as an investment. With any investment, you need to calculate an ROI (return on investment).

Here is the basic formula:

ROI= Gain from investment – cost of investment/cost of investment

For example:

You have an English to French translation, let’s say a brochure, and it costs you $300 to translate.
You send them to your French customers and receive $5000.00 in orders.

Your ROI is: ~1 566%

Now, for all you purists out there, the equation really is more complicated than this. You have to factor in the cost of printing your brochures, mailing, etc. But this is just an example that I’m using to get my point across.

Translation services are an investment in growth, customer service, and worker satisfaction.
Ok, now that I’ve gotten that out of the way. Let’s talk about translation rates.

Translation Rates – Region to Region

Translations rates vary significantly from region to region. A 1000 word English to French translation done in Quebec, Canada might be significantly cheaper than that same document translated by a company in Albuquerque, New Mexico. That’s a factor of supply. The company in Albuquerque may not have access to a huge roster of French translators.

Translation Rates – Qualifications

Aside from availability of translators, you also have different qualifications of the translators. If you have a legal document translation or a technical manual translation, the translation rate would vary compared to the translation of a birth certificate or non-technical marketing material. This is because the qualifications of someone that is translating an affidavit would have to be much higher than a typical translator owing to the fact that the legal sector has specialized terms. Beyond this, the consumer needs to guard against the potential risk of poor translation when it comes to highly technical documents.

Translation Rates – Translation Memory

Finally, the availability of translation memory factors in to your long term translation rate. Translation memory is basically a database of special terms from your previous translation projects. If you work in a highly specialized sector with niche specific terms, those terms will be stored in your translation memory. Your translation rate will decrease as time goes on because our translators can draw on your previous projects instead of having to re-invent the wheel.

So, the long and short of it is this: translation rates vary significantly. You are best off actually submitting a document for quotation versus trying to find an online list of pricing. Pricing listings do not take into account the complexity and nature of your translation projects.

11362548-roi--return-of-invertelment-concept-in-word-tag-cloud-on-white-background

I don’t care what you call it as long as you’re measuring it.

If you’re looking for a general guideline, translation rates will vary anywhere from $0.15-$0.40/word depending on type of document, rarity of the language, and time frame. For translation projects that involve graphics, the translation services provider may offer desktop publishing at a rate of $60-$80/hour.

Able Translation’s translation services fall at the bottom end of the spectrum in terms of price but that is because we have access to an extensive pool of translators and have on-staff desktop publishers and web developers.

Submit a document and we’ll get in contact with you immediately.

For more information, check out these resources:

Translate Tweets to Explode in the Twitterverse (and make more cash online)

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How to Choose a Language Services Provider

Translate Tweets to Explode in the Twitterverse (and make more cash online)

Translate Tweets to reach other markets

First, if you aren’t on Twitter, get on it! The beauty of Twitter is your ability to have open conversations. You don’t need to wait for friend requests or “likes”. You just tweet and the world can hear you. Ok, I’ll wait while you finish your twitter registration.

Now that you’re all done registering for Twitter, we can talk what you need to do to translate tweets and auto-tweet them. Auto-tweeting is a way for you to automate tweets. You can upload a batch of 140 character messages and they will be released on a schedule. I recommend using TweetDeck. To reach target markets that speak a different language, you should write 6 -12 months worth of Twitter messages and have them translated. You would than slowly release them to the public during hours that you know your target market is online.

I’ll explain why you should do this. Firstly, 72.1 percent of the consumers spend most or all of their time on sites in their own language. When you translate tweets, you’ll start to engage the population that prefers to browse in their own language. Secondly, 56.2 percent of consumers say that the ability to obtain information in their own language is more important than price. What does this tell you about consumers? What I hear is that people feel more engaged and willing to do business in their first language.

Basically, here’s the deal. The old marketing adage is this: people buy emotionally and justify with facts. You could totally machine translate facts but the emotional component will get lost without someone personally translating your tweets. Beyond that, twitter is built on human interaction. Using machine translation to translate tweets defeats the purpose.

I’ll break this process down into steps.

  1. Write several months worth of tweets.
  2. Send them to Able Translations to professionally translate tweets for you.
  3. Upload the translated tweets into TweetDeck.
  4. Schedule the release of your translated tweets.
  5. Get a bigger wallet to hold all the cash you’ll make.

Pro-Tip: Open a Facebook business page for several different languages and link your twitter and facebook accounts. Your translated tweets will populate on your Facebook page as they are released.

For more information on multilingual internet marketing, check out these posts:

Search Engine Optimization for International Companies

Brand Internationalization Strategy for Small and Mid-sized Companies

Man Vs Machine…Translation

or head back to Toronto Translators

Search Engine Optimization for International Companies

Note: Today is the last day to enter our sweepstakes. Just “like” www.facebook.com/abletranslationsen for a chance to win one of the $20 Amazon.com Gift Cards!

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is hard enough as is. Throw in multiple languages and different locales and you’re in for a REAL treat. I’m going to talk to you about SEO for international companies but I’m working on the assumption that you know what SEO is and you have an SEO strategy. If you don’t know what SEO is, check this out: http://www.seomoz.org/beginners-guide-to-seo. It’ll give you the basics.

What on Earth is Localization?

Alright, I feel comfortable making the assumption that you know what SEO is but localization is a completely different story. Unless you work in a specific industry like the language services industry, it’s unlikely that you’ve come across this term before. So, let’s dive right in!

Localization involves taking content written for one locale and tailoring it to meet the needs of another.

For Example:

You have an online store that sells, oh I don’t know, custom floor mats for cars. So far, you’re dominating the Canadian floor mat market and you see an opportunity to break into the Japanese market. To carve your niche, you start adding your website to online Japanese floor mat retailer directories.

Six months pass and not a single order has come in from Japan. Time to pack it up, right? Wrong! You need to localize. So, you hire a company to translate all of your text to Japanese and you’re off to the races.

Make Sure You:

• Adjust your website layout to account for an increase/decrease in text. Some languages add up to 40% more characters per body of text

• Update measurements, currency, and date format to fit with local customs

• Update photos to feature places and people that represent your new market’s culture

This is Just the Start…

Translating your text to the language of your market is only the first step in SEO localization. You need to do the exact same things you did for your English website SEO. Let’s review those steps and I’ll explain the localization strategy.

Link Building

You’re going to have to build links that are relevant in your new market. Where does your new market look for your product (directories, blogs, twitter, facebook)? Make sure you’re there and speaking their language. Connect with social media influencers in your target locale.

Keywording

This is where you’re definitely going to need a professional. You can’t just ask someone to translate keywords that are popular in your current location and expect them to be popular in a different country. In Canada, we may search for “social media marketing agencies” but in a different country that string might be useless. The prevailing term for social media marketing in a different country might be “internet advertising companies” in which case you haven’t used any of those words.

I guess this is the perfect time to explain long-tail and short-tail keywords because this will be the most difficult part. In some languages, depending on the context, the form of a word might change (context-sensitive spelling). So a singular keyword planted throughout your content might be useless because people often search using long-tailed strings.

Website Design and Usability

Your website has to reflect the way users navigate your website. Look at other websites in your target locale and find best practices. Where do they prefer the menu? Do they use “bread crumb links” or navigation side bars? Do they mostly share using Facebook or do they use Twitter? Ultimately, sharing your content will help you leaps and bounds so you need to set sharing features up in a way that your target market is most comfortable with.

This is just a taste of what you’re in for when you decide to do SEO localization. If you have any questions visit Abletranslations.com.

For more on international marketing check out:

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Brand Internationalization Strategy for Small and Mid-sized Companies

Taken from:
http://ezinearticles.com/?Brand-Internationalization-Strategy-for-Small-and-Mid-Sized-Companies&id=7269280

I know I shouldn’t, but I’m going to. After all, I’m a rebel. If you follow the literature on social media, you’ll see that most experts recommend starting online articles with a personal story. But I’m not going to. To be honest, I wracked my brain for a personal story on brand internationalization and finished the day with a blank page. Surprising, right? So, I thought to myself, “Why don’t you just fabricate a story?” And I did. Boy, did it sound disingenuous. Instead, I’m going to approach the subject of brand internationalization from the orientations that I feel most comfortable with, fairy tales and sociology.

A Long, Long Time Ago in a Kingdom, Far, Far Away…

There lived a sociologist, Emile Durkheim, who coined the term “collective consciousness”. Without bombarding you with technical mumbo-jumbo (mumbo-jumbo, being the technical term for boring filler), I’ll skip to the point.

Emile Durkheim suggested that societies are bound together by shared beliefs, values, and attitudes. This was characteristic of groups of people living within a limited proximity. When he coined the term at the end of the 19th century, Durkheim was mainly looking at the beginnings of industrial society, a far cry from the social arrangements that characterize the 2000s.

The Goose That Laid the Global Egg

The internet has blurred borders, both physical and cultural. We live in a global society but because of the spread of information, Durkheim’s perspective still rings true. There are some basic ideas and attitudes that are universal. These universals have become central in brand internationalization.

Enter, the Big Brand Wolf

big brand wolf
He’ll Huff and He’ll Puff and He’ll GROOOOOW Your Brand

Small and mid-sized organizations that haven’t taken steps to internationalize their brand are actually in a position to do so in a more effective way than organizations that have already built up a concrete brand image. You have the luxury of forethought.

Let me explain. There are two major schools of thought when it comes to internationalizing your brand. You can:

a) Re-brand in every market you enter

b) You can choose a universal appeal (remember the global collective conscious?) and make small tweaks in each locale.

Option (B) is cost-effective and efficient at creating a recognizable brand but it involves thinking ahead. You have to decide on a universal value or attitude on which to base your brand before you make your debut on the international stage.

The Seven Dwarves of International Branding

After reviewing your marketing demographics and finding your target market, you’ve got to think a little bit about what makes them tick on a personal level but think big picture. Do they value family? Friendship? Saving money? These are your universals. Your long-term branding strategy should be based on this. The seven dwarves will help you make the brand locally appealing.

Meet the seven dwarves of brand internationalization:

Disney got here first
…Disney got here before you did

Language – this is a given, all marketing material must be distributed in the language of the target market. ’nuff said.

Culture – Get a consultant! Some cultures consider some topics taboo, favor a particular selling environment, or aren’t buying what you’re selling (think winter hats in Morocco)

Graphics – feature local talent, use colors that represent your message (these change by region), and ensure translated text will fit in your logo.

Idioms – For an international message, stay away from English idioms. They don’t translate well.

Content flow – The often forgotten Dwarf. Your text layout should follow local customs.

Software/website – You need to localize your software and website. This means changing the date/time/currency formats/measurements, text field lengths for phone numbers and addresses, as well as everything else that has been mentioned.

Regulations – consult an expert on local regulations. Do they require a specific format on your product labels? Do they have different language and accessibility laws in place? All your work will be for not if you don’t meet local laws.

These points are critical in reaching your target market. You can use a generic marketing message but then you won’t be leveraging your communications.

Live Happily Ever After

Here are the takeaway points:

• Think globally and pick a universally appealing brand value or attitude

• Tweak your message according to cultural nuances and standards

• Avoid generic marketing messages when going international

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7269280

For more on international marketing check out:

Translate Tweets to Explode in the Twitterverse (and make more cash online)

or head back to Toronto Translators

Man Vs Machine…Translation

Welcome to the Ring

In the red corner, standing 5’8” and weighing in at 165lbs. He types 80 words per minute and speaks three languages. He has remained undefeated for HUNDREDS and hundreds of years. I give you…THE HUMAN TRANSLATOR.

And in the blue corner, standing…well…it doesn’t really stand and weighing…um does computer code weigh anything? It can translate a document of any size into any language in seconds. He’s the newest challenger in the industry but seems to be unstoppable. Here is…MACHINE TRANSLATION.

The Blow by Blow

Human translation and machine translation both have their strengths and weaknesses and their usefulness depends on context. Let’s take a look at what makes both translation strategies unique and explore some of their benefits and drawbacks.

The Human Translator

The human translator is exactly what it sounds like, a human doing the translating. Now, keep in mind, we aren’t talking a pen and paper process here. Technology does play a huge role in human translating. Aside from word processing, projects tend to use project management workflow software to keep everything on track. Human translators can also use what is known as “translation memory management” systems. Essentially, this is a database that stores translatable “units” (sentences, headings, even paragraphs of text). It helps a project with more than one translator become one cohesive output. This software is especially popular with very technical translations (think machine operating manuals). You need to have processes, instructions, or machine parts defined in the same way. Translation memory helps you do that.

Benefits:

  • Human translators strike a balance between the words you use and the ideas you are trying to get across. This leaves you with a cohesive, error free project
  • Human translators are bound by significant quality standards thus your project is handled very carefully
  • Human translators can verify information and give recommendations to improve your project

 

Drawbacks:

  • Human translators are not available for free download
  • Their output isn’t instantaneous
  • They consume all of the coffee in the office

 

Human translators should be consulted when handling large, complex projects that require high quality translations (ecommerce websites, marketing material, software localization, books and ebooks, movie subtitles, etc).

 

Machine Translation

Google has done a superb job in their creation of machine translation software. They provide near instant translations, regardless of word count. Their algorithms have improved significantly since their beta-launch. Machine translation approaches a document from a word-for-word point of view. It looks at individual units of language, not the totality of meaning, sometimes with hilarious results.

Benefits:

  • Extremely fast
  • Extremely inexpensive (often free)
  • Near endless options for language availability
  • Conveniently available from any computer

 

Drawbacks:

  • Will not contextualize the translation, which often leads to some pretty funny translation errors
  • Will not proofread. If you’ve made a mistake, it will translate it anyways
  • Some English phrases and idioms cannot be translated with the same meaning, machine translation doesn’t notice.

 

As you can see, machine translation software is pretty awesome if you need to quickly translate something. Say, if you’re emailing your Korean pen pal or your Romanian grandmother sent you your favorite recipe (at least that’s what you think it is…). But because it can’t contextualize your words and it won’t alert you to an error if your thoughts won’t be expressed as intended, you should avoid using machine translation on projects associated with your business or organization. It’s risky. Some companies have had PR nightmares from poor translations.

 

IT’S A TOTAL KNOCKOUT!

The human translator retains its title. Well, maybe I fixed the match but I truly believe there is no replacement for human translation.

 

Visit us for information on translation services.

For more on international marketing check out:

Translate Tweets to Explode in the Twitterverse (and make more cash online)

or head back to Toronto Translators